970-399-9507

Colorado Lifestyle

Explore These Charming Western Colorado Towns

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Are you dreaming of a quieter, more peaceful lifestyle surrounded by stunning natural beauty? Look no further than the small towns of Western Colorado. From the “Gateway to the Grand Mesa” to the “City of Murals,” these Western Colorado towns offer a unique blend of outdoor recreation, friendly communities, and a slower pace of life. Let’s explore some of the best small towns in Colorado’s Western Slope region. Living in Cedaredge, Colorado True to its name, Cedaredge sits on the “edge of the cedars” and serves as the gateway to the Grand Mesa. With a population of around 2,000, Cedaredge offers a variety of activities and lifestyles. Stroll down Main Street to discover charming shops and restaurants, hit the links at Cedaredge Golf Club, or explore the Grand Mesa for fishing, hiking, snowmobiling, Nordic skiing, camping, and hunting. Living in Crawford, Colorado Crawford is a quintessential small town in Colorado with ample land and tranquility. Home to fewer than 500 residents, Crawford is known as the entry to the North Rim of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, offering year-round recreation and breathtaking views. Imagine owning acres of land surrounded by the Colorado Western Slope’s natural wonders. Living in Delta, Colorado As the largest town and county seat of Delta County, Delta offers a variety of dining, shopping, and entertainment options. Known locally as the “City of Murals,” Delta’s downtown buildings showcase beautiful paintings by local artists. With a population of around 9,000, Delta perfectly balances amenities and small-town charm. Living in Orchard City, Colorado Comprised of the communities of Austin, Cory, and Eckert, Orchard City, is a top fruit distributor in the region. Situated between Cedaredge for recreation and Delta for entertainment, Orchard City boasts scenic landscapes, wineries, excellent river fishing, and unique attractions. Discover the beauty and bounty of this aptly named small town in Colorado. Living in the North Fork Valley: Hotchkiss, Colorado, and Paonia, Colorado Approximately 30 miles east of Delta lies Hotchkiss, Colorado, nicknamed “the friendliest town around.” With a population of about 1,300, Hotchkiss is renowned for its easy access to outdoor recreation in every direction, including Paonia State Park, Crawford State Park, and the Black Canyon of the Gunnison. Experience the warmth of a tight-knit community while enjoying endless adventures. Paonia is a gem among Western Colorado towns, known for its expansive land, thriving agriculture, and prosperous orchards and wineries. Downtown Paonia exudes charm with its historic buildings along Grand Avenue. Situated along the North Fork Gunnison River, Paonia offers seasonal fishing and year-round scenic views. Which Western Colorado Town is Right for You? From mountains to winding rivers, the small towns in Colorado’s Western Slope region offer a lifestyle that combines natural beauty, friendly communities, and endless outdoor adventures. If you’re ready to embrace a slower pace of life and immerse yourself in the charm of Western Colorado towns, our team at Western Land & Lifestyle Properties is here to help you find your dream property. Contact us today to start your journey to calling one of these best towns in Colorado home.

Read More

Southwest-Style Home in the Mountains: Discover Your Dream

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Welcome to the heart of Western Colorado, where Cedaredge stands as a testament to those who find joy in spacious skies, the calm of the wilderness, and the thrill of outdoor adventure. At 20092 High Park Rd, this isn’t just any house. It’s a lifestyle – a Southwest-style home that captures what it means to live luxuriously amid Colorado’s stunning landscapes. Living the Western Colorado Dream This place is for folks who dream of a life close to nature but don’t want to skimp on comfort and luxury. Imagine waking to views of the San Juans, West Elk Mountains, and the vast Grand Mesa. This mountain home is a respite for those who love the great outdoors but appreciate the finer things in life. Southwest-Style Home with a Modern Twist The design of this mountain home is all about bringing together the warmth of Southwest style with the convenience of modern living. It blends coziness and elegance, featuring 4 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, and over 3,600 sq ft of space. The heart of the home is the kitchen, decked out with top-notch appliances and designed for memorable family meals and entertaining friends.   Adventure Starts at Your Front Door If outdoor adventures call your name, this place is your dream come true. Set in a community that treasures open spaces, you’ve got skiing, hiking, mountain biking, and fly fishing right in your backyard. With 13.11 acres to call your own and direct access to public lands, your options for exploration are endless. A Community That Feels Like Home Cedaredge isn’t just about beautiful homes; it’s about a way of life that blends privacy, community, and luxury living. This property is perfect for anyone looking for a Southwest-style home with stunning views – seeking a lifestyle enriched by outdoor activities, community events, and local culture. Your Next Chapter Starts Here 20092 High Park Rd isn’t just an address; it’s your entry into a lifestyle many people dream about, but few get to live. It’s a chance to blend the outdoor lifestyle with luxury living in one of the most beautiful places in Colorado. If Cedaredge is calling your name, and you’re picturing yourself in this Southwest-style gem, I’m here to help make that picture a reality. Reach out, and let’s chat about how this home could be yours. Here’s to living the Western Colorado dream at 20092 High Park Rd.

Read More

Exploring Alternative Properties in Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

For those seeking a break from the urban grind of the Front Range, Western Colorado is a gateway to an alternative lifestyle. Many buyers in this region aren’t just looking for a house; they’re seeking a sustainable, cost-effective way of living. This demand has sparked a wave of innovative housing solutions, making alternative properties a prominent feature of the Western Colorado real estate market. Tiny Homes in Colorado Tiny homes, typically around 400 square feet, offer a minimalist lifestyle with minimal utility costs. They are often constructed with eco-friendly materials and can be customized to suit individual needs. While they can be cost-effective, challenges include finding suitable land, navigating zoning regulations, and potentially limited financing options due to their size and unconventional nature. Earth Berm Houses in Colorado Earth berm houses, also known as earth-sheltered houses, are built partly underground, utilizing a berm or hillside as the majority of the roof and walls. This construction style provides excellent insulation and can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs. However, finding suitable land with the right topography and ensuring compliance with local building codes and regulations can be challenging. Shipping Container Homes in Colorado Shipping container homes are made from repurposed shipping containers, offering a unique and modern living space. These homes are eco-friendly, as they reuse materials that would otherwise be discarded. They are also highly customizable and can be expanded or modified easily. However, obtaining building permits and connecting to utilities can be complex, and some areas may restrict using shipping containers for residential purposes. Straw Bale Houses in Colorado Straw bale construction is a sustainable building method that uses tightly packed straw bales as insulation within a structural frame. This construction style provides excellent insulation and can be cost-effective. However, it is essential to ensure that the straw bales are protected from moisture to prevent mold growth. Financing and insurance can be challenging due to the unconventional nature of straw bale construction. Barndominium Houses in Colorado Barndominiums combine the rustic charm of a barn with the comforts of a modern home. They are typically large, open-concept steel buildings with living and working spaces. The living space often features high ceilings and an industrial aesthetic, while the working space can be used for various purposes, such as a workshop or storage area. While barndominiums are affordable and low-maintenance, challenges include obtaining financing and ensuring compliance with local zoning regulations, as they are a relatively new housing concept. Resale value can also be a consideration, as the unique design may appeal to a limited number of buyers. Considerations About Alternative Properties While alternative properties offer upfront savings, they may come with long-term challenges. Factors like insurance, maintenance, and resale value should be carefully considered. Exploring alternative properties in Western Colorado can be a rewarding journey, but it’s essential to weigh the pros and cons of each option. Whether you’re looking to buy or sell an alternative property, Western Land & Lifestyle Properties is here to help you navigate the process. Contact me, Robert Gash, at 970-986-2955 to discuss your options and make the most of your real estate investment.

Read More

Western Colorado Fence Laws Explained

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Western Colorado is a place with vast landscapes and an open-hearted way of living. However, even in such wide spaces, there are rules we follow to live together peacefully, especially when it comes to managing our land and animals. That’s where understanding fences and livestock comes into play. This blog post will explore Western Colorado fence laws and what you should know to be a respectful landowner. Open Range and Fence Laws In this part of Colorado, there’s a unique approach to handling livestock: you don’t need to fence your animals in, but if you don’t want others’ animals wandering onto your property, you have to fence them out. This idea might seem strange, but it’s all about making good use of the land and respecting each other’s property. Colorado has a fence law that defines what happens if animals go where they’re not supposed to. If you have a “lawful fence” – which means a strong fence made of three strands of barbed wire, posts about twenty feet apart, and gates that are just as strong – and someone else’s livestock comes onto your land, you could receive money for any damage they cause. This law covers many animals, like horses, cows, goats, and even buffalo. Dealing with Animals on Your Property If you ever find animals that aren’t yours on your property, the first step is to try and contact their owner if you know who they are. If you can’t figure out who the owner is, you should call a brand inspector for help. You’re allowed to take care of the animals temporarily, but you have to make sure they’re well taken care of, and you need to inform a brand inspector within five days so they can help find the owner. The Importance of Good Fences There’s a famous saying: “Good fences make good neighbors.” This is very true in Western Colorado. Keeping your fences in good condition and ensuring your animals stay where they’re supposed to be is key to living in harmony with your neighbors. Here are some tips for a smooth life in this region: Ensure your animals have enough water and food. If any of your animals wander off, bring them back as soon as possible. Regularly check your fences to make sure they’re sturdy and secure. Work together with neighbors on shared fences to keep them well-maintained. Do Your Part To Enjoy Western Colorado Living here is about enjoying freedom, showing respect, and caring for our land and animals. By understanding fence laws and following these simple guidelines, we can all appreciate the beauty and community of Western Colorado.

Read More

How To Purchase a Wedding Venue in Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

For those eyeing the wedding industry from the lens of a real estate investor, purchasing a wedding venue in Colorado can be a promising venture. However, as with any substantial opportunity, it comes with significant commitments. Finding a wedding venue for sale, navigating through zoning committees, managing renovation costs, and securing financing are all integral steps. Yet, for the fearless entrepreneur, this endeavor could mark the perfect opening move for a first business or an expansion. Steps to Launch Your Wedding Venue Once the decision to venture into the wedding venue business is made, it’s imperative to immerse yourself in the industry. Forge connections with wedding vendors who can provide invaluable advice and recommendations throughout the process. Embarking on the journey to owning a wedding venue in dreamy Colorado involves these six strategic steps. With a robust network in place, the real work begins: 1. Assess Your Current Finances Understanding your current financial standing and predicting expenses should guide major decisions. Questions like whether to purchase or lease a property, having enough cash for a down payment, and deciding between building anew or refurbishing an existing structure are crucial. This financial clarity sets the stage for determining the type and amount of small business loan needed. Credit score evaluation and creating a comprehensive financial portfolio are essential steps in securing a loan. 2. Finding a Wedding Venue For Sale in Colorado With finances sorted, the search for a wedding venue for sale commences. Rural or urban, barn or outdoor space – the choices are endless. Pinterest proves a surprisingly effective ally in gathering inspiration. Understanding local zoning laws and building regulations is paramount, ensuring your venue meets legal requirements. This phase also involves auditing the property, making preliminary decisions about renovations, and potentially planning additional services. I’m partial to Western Colorado, known for its breathtaking landscapes, including majestic mountains, rolling vineyards, and serene lakes. Western Colorado provides an enchanting backdrop for any celebration. The diverse and stunning natural settings in Western Colorado, from the towering Rockies to the lush valleys, offer a unique charm that can elevate the wedding experience. Moreover, the region’s mild climate enhances the possibility of year-round outdoor events. Choosing Western Colorado for your wedding venue not only aligns with the romantic aspirations of couples but also taps into the growing trend of destination weddings seeking the perfect blend of nature’s beauty and celebration.  3. Deciding What to Renovate While it might seem like the next step is financing, a crucial intermediate step involves deciding what renovations are immediate and what can be deferred. Consulting with a contractor or architect is essential to estimate the costs of initial renovations. Prioritizing essentials like water supply, restrooms, catering space, shelter, venue size, and parking ensures a functional and code-compliant space. When writing this blog post, I actually have a historic home for sale in Western Colorado that would be perfect for a wedding venue. Built in 1911, the main house exudes history around every corner – wood finishes, stained glass windows, and classic touches. Furthermore, the property includes a separate 3-bed, 2-bath guest apartment, offering plenty of room to host guests. With 39 picturesque acres at the base of the Grand Mesa, the world’s largest flattop mountain, there’s plenty to love about the potential to transform this historic home into a wedding venue. Click here to learn more about the Stolte House for sale. 4. Financing Your Wedding Venue Now equipped with a plan, securing financing becomes a focus. Depending on available capital and immediate needs, you can explore options like personal loans for business, short-term loans, business lines of credit, and business credit cards. This step is pivotal in translating plans into action. 5. Improving on the Go A unique advantage of a wedding venue is the ability to make improvements while conducting business. For rural or outdoor spaces, showcasing and renting the space can start as soon as you complete foundational improvements. While less amenable to ongoing work, indoor spaces can utilize the remodeling period for networking and preview events. 6. Keeping Your Target Audience in Mind In an industry where the couple is king, tailoring choices to their preferences is paramount. Your marketing strategies should target these potential customers, including an appealing website, strategic search optimization, and a robust social media presence. Positive word-of-mouth recommendations and client feedback become the bedrock of future improvements. Your Dream Wedding Venue in Colorado Awaits Launching a successful wedding venue is complex but can be smooth. Take it one step at a time – finding the perfect wedding venue for sale, focusing on preparations, and adapting plans based on industry feedback. A wedding venue’s adaptable nature allows for continued improvements, presenting a lucrative opportunity for investors ready to leverage the business. For more information about my current listings or finding a wedding venue for sale in Colorado, contact me, Kayla Klein, at Western Land & Lifestyle Properties.

Read More

Everything You Need To Know About BLM Land in Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Established in 1946, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is a subdivision of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The agency strives “to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.” Most BLM land is located in the Western half of the U.S. in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. What Is BLM Land in Colorado? In Colorado, the BLM manages 8.3 million acres of public land and 27 million acres of federal mineral estates. Most public lands are located on the Western Slope, varying in size and terrain, including tundras, canyons, deserts, and mountains. The public lands are used for recreation, energy development, conservation, resource management, livestock grazing, and more. Where Is BLM Land? Most of Colorado’s BLM land is located on the Western Slope, the perfect place for hiking, camping, biking, skiing, snowmobiling, and tons of other recreational activities. Before you plan your outing, however, you should check online to make sure where you’re going is actually BLM land, not private property or land that requires paid access. The official BLM website has this interactive map that helps you visualize different locations.  Can You Own BLM Land? Technically, if a piece of BLM land in Colorado went up for sale, you could purchase it, but then it would be privately owned and no longer BLM land. Furthermore, due to a congressional mandate passed in 1976, the BLM rarely offers land for sale. It will only sell land if the parcel doesn’t align with current land use or planning efforts. You can, however, own land that borders BLM land, which completely transforms your opportunities for enjoyment. Is BLM Land Free To Camp On? Many people wonder if BLM land is free to camp on, and the answer varies. The BLM manages plenty of camping grounds, whether you want to park your RV at a developed campground or pitch a tent in the wilderness under the stars. The former will most likely require a reservation and a fee, while the latter is called dispersed camping and is usually free as long as you stay on the ground in the background. Most BLM land mandates that you cannot camp for longer than 14 days in a 28 consecutive-day period. Buying Colorado Land That Borders BLM Owning land that borders BLM land is one of the greatest opportunities for land-seekers in Western Colorado. Imagine opening your gate to hundreds of acres of protected land for optimal recreation. The good news is that land that borders BLM land is much more widely available.  At Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, we often list properties that border BLM land in Colorado. Click here to browse some of our listings, and keep checking back for new ones to fit your ownership vision. To schedule a showing, contact me, Robert Gash – I’m a real estate broker and Accredited Land Consultant, so I can help you maximize your land investments in Colorado.

Read More

Common Irrigation Methods in Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Last week, I wrote about water rights in Western Colorado, so this week, I wanted to talk about irrigation water and irrigation methods in Western Colorado that enable you to make the most of your land. This blog post will cover ditch easements, popular irrigation methods, and how to handle tailwater to keep your land property irrigated.  What are the Most Popular Irrigation Methods? Understanding different irrigation methods will help you implement one that will work best for you, given your water rights and what you need from your land. There are several different methods to distribute water across the irrigated ground, but the two main types of irrigation fall under two categories: flood or sprinkler irrigation.  Flood Irrigation Flood irrigation is a simple and primitive method of irrigation. It is typically less expensive to install than sprinkler irrigation but much more labor-intensive. The following irrigation methods are all different types of flood irrigation.  Tarp and Dam Despite being one of the most primitive flood irrigation methods, the tarp and dam method remains effective and popular. As the name suggests, you stretch a piece of plastic or fabric tarp across a ditch, creating a dam to trap water. Open ditches are the most common way of transporting water. Many of these open ditches run along property lines. Therefore, as the tarp creates a dam, the dammed water backs up and flows over the top of the ditch and onto the land.  Secondary ditches allow the overflowing water to stretch across a section of land. Marks (lines) are scratched in the ground, allowing the flooding water to follow the marked lines across the land and distribute the water.  When the water reaches the end of the pasture, the property owner will release the dam and create a new one farther down the ditch.  Gated Pipe A gated pipe is another flood irrigation method. Here, you line a plastic pipe along a property line, and water from a ditch enters the plastic pipe through a headgate or valve.  Plastic gates are installed along the pipe every 18 inches or so. A series of gates are opened, allowing water to spill out of the pipe and into the marks or lines in the ground. This allows the water to flow evenly.  As the water reaches the end of the pasture, the open gates are closed, and the next series of gates are opened. Siphon Tubes Siphon tubes can also distribute water from a ditch across the land. Typically, these ditches are concrete ditches that run along a property line. Aluminum tubes are placed every 18 inches or so along the ditch. A siphon is created that allows water to flow through the tubes and into the field marks.  When the water has saturated the ground, the tubes are reset and moved farther down the ditch.  Sprinkler Irrigation Sprinklers require water pressure through gravity or a pump but offer a more efficient way to deliver water to the land than the flood irrigation methods mentioned above. While the upfront cost can be high, a sprinkled pasture is typically more productive and requires less labor. Sprinklers also eliminate the need for placing marks in the ground, as is required for most flood irrigation methods. The following are different types of sprinkler systems used for sprinkler irrigation.  Big Gun Sprinklers Big gun sprinklers are mobile sprinklers with wheels that help them move to places that need water. A hose connects these sprinklers to a valve. The valves are strategically placed to shoot the water and saturate an area of the property before moving on to the next.  Side Rolls Side roll sprinklers consist of an elevated water pipe supported by large wheels with sprinklers mounted along it. Side roll sprinklers must be moved manually along a path. They typically have a small gasoline engine and gears that move the giant side roll to and fro along a path.  A hose connects the side roll to a pressurized water pipe with valves, and the hose must be disconnected and reconnected every time the side roll is moved to a new location along its path. Center Pivots Center pivots are a type of sprinkler in which the water comes up through a pipe in the center and runs out to various sprinklers along a giant arm. The center pivot moves in a circular pattern, and wheels allow the arm to move around the center pivot until the full or half-circle is completed. Drip Irrigation Many orchards and vineyards utilize drip irrigation to water rows of fruit trees or grapevines. This eliminates the unnecessary waste of water. Drip irrigation puts water at the base of each tree or vine, eliminating unnecessary water waste. What Happens When the Water Reaches the End of My Pasture?  Tailwater is the water that has reached the end of the pasture. In addition to having ditches on the uphill side to deliver water, it is also necessary to have ditches on the downhill side to catch the water as it reaches the end of the pasture. Water users are responsible for their tailwater, and it must be collected and transported back to the main ditch or strategically distributed to neighboring properties. However, you should always maintain your ditches and ensure your water is not creating a problem for neighboring properties. What is a Ditch Easement?  Another aspect of water rights that property owners need to know is about the ditch easement on their property.  In Western Colorado, ditch companies and water users have a right to access private property to check water, clean ditches, check on headgates, and otherwise maintain the waterway.  Even though you own your property, you must be aware of these rights, and you cannot prevent these water users from accessing your property to check their water. This means you cannot construct a fence or install landscaping that might block the water users from bringing in equipment to clean the irrigation ditches. Water users have the right to remove fences

Read More

Navigating Water Rights in Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

They say whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting. While I can’t attest to any fatalities over water rights, it’s undeniable that they’ve sparked numerous disputes. Understanding water rights in Western Colorado is intricate and indispensable for effective property management. Here’s a concise breakdown to shed light on this complex topic. Types of Water Rights in Colorado Colorado boasts diverse water rights, encompassing well rights, spring rights, and irrigation water rights. These are further categorized into “decreed” and “reservoir” water rights. This discussion will delve into the specifics of decreed and reservoir water rights. The Start of the System The journey of irrigation water in Western Colorado commences with snow. Blanketing the Colorado mountains in winter, this snow transforms into a vital water source as it melts during spring, coursing down into the valleys. Understanding Decreed Water Rights In the late 1800s, as the Western land saw settlement, reservoirs, and ditches were constructed to manage water distribution. Colorado established water rights through the “first in use, first in right” principle. Simply put, the first person diverting water to their land gained priority rights, with subsequent users securing rights based on the order of establishment. These rights, commonly known as decreed or adjudicated water rights, are often tied to a specific piece of land, documented in the property deed, and transferred from one owner to the next. What is a Share of Decreed Water? Water is typically measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS). A water right for decreed water might be expressed in a fraction of a share, such as: “An undivided one-half interest in and to the 1.0 CFS decreed to the Carbon Ditch as Priority H-25.” This means that the user has a right to 0.5 CFS in the Carbon Ditch, and Priority H-25 is the level of priority to use that water. To further explain, as the snow melts in early spring (usually April 1 of each year), water is placed in the ditch. This is referred to as free water or early water. It is typically available to all property owners along a ditch, regardless of whether they have water rights. As the people with water rights begin to use their water, if there is not enough to go around, the free water ends, and only users with water rights can utilize the amount of water they have a right to. If water is plentiful and everyone can get their rightful share nothing is done, and everyone is happy. However, as the water begins to deplete, water begins to get shut off to certain users, starting with the lowest priority water right. This ensures that the highest priority water rights owner can access their rightful amount of water for the longest period. All water must be measured before it can be diverted. The device for this measurement is called a Parshall Flume. A Parshall Flume is a fixed hydraulic structure set in a ditch and used to measure water flow. It allows an accurate reading of the water volume by accelerating the flow rate to match the depth of the flume. Water must be measured to ensure the appropriate amount of water is delivered. Decreed water is allowed to flow until it gets shut off due to higher-priority users placing calls for their water. Depending on the seasonal water supply, this process could mean water flows for a month or two or the entire year. Understanding Reservoir Water Rights Reservoir water is stored in a reservoir or a series of reservoirs and owned by shareholders. These shareholders can buy and sell their water shares separately from any land purchase. As long as the water can be delivered from the reservoir to a particular piece of land, these shares can be delivered to multiple parcels. What is a Share of Reservoir Water?  A share of reservoir water means nothing outside of your water system. One share of water from one reservoir may be equal to 1,000 shares of water in another. Each reservoir company has an established amount of water that equates to each share. For example, in Company A, 1 share of water may equate to 1 CFS Alternatively, in Company B, 1 share might equate to 5 CFS  The amount of water for each share can vary drastically depending on the water stored in the reservoir. Every spring, the reservoir company’s board of directors meets with shareholders to establish the water available for each shareholder.  Reservoir water is ordered for days, and the amount delivered is deducted from the total amount available. For instance, you may own 10 shares of water, which equates to 10 CFS of water. Say you order 0.5 CFS for 4 days. After 4 days, your water is shut off, and you have used 2 CFS of your 10 CFS allotment. You still have 8 CFS of water to be ordered throughout the season. 1 CFS = 1.983 acre-feet per day = 646,320 gallons = 2,447 cubic meters of water Optimizing Reservoir Water Shares for Irrigation To irrigate effectively, you must portion your water shares across many months of the growing season. How much water do you need for irrigation? That is dependent on several factors. How dry is the land? What is the condition of your soil? How healthy are your crops? Can you harvest or graze your crops at the ideal time? Is Mother Nature providing additional help in the form of rainfall? Efficient irrigation involves strategic allocation of water shares across the growing season, contingent on factors like soil conditions, crop health, and the intervention of Mother Nature. Understanding Water Rights Ownership in Colorado In Colorado, all water belongs to the state. Water rights confer the legal right to use the water, subject to adjudication. Abandoning these rights through non-use for a specified period can lead to the state claiming abandonment. For queries on how water rights impact your Western Colorado real estate transactions, contact me at rob@wesellthewest.com.

Read More

Should I Invest in a Luxury Ranch in Colorado?

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Many years ago, people flocked to cities for jobs and comfort, relying on ranchers in rural areas to provide food. Today, most people live in cities, and many want to escape the crowded city life, so once-functional ranches have become a coveted rarity. A luxury ranch in Colorado, Texas, Utah, Wyoming, and similar states symbolizes riches and grandeur, appealing to ranchers, investors, and recreation seekers alike. In Wild Western Colorado, it’s your ranch, your rules. While the price tag on luxury ranches is high, the rewards are too. Here are four compelling reasons to invest. 1. Endless Opportunities Whether you want to escape the hustle and bustle of city life or fully immerse yourself in the Western Colorado lifestyle, a luxury ranch is a place to do it. You’ll have hundreds of acres to enjoy the views, recreate, train horses, raise cattle, grow crops, hunt, fish, and take in everything your land provides. A luxury ranch in Colorado can serve as an extra income source too. Many people want to experience the benefits of a luxury ranch but don’t have the means or need to purchase one. As a landowner, you can rent out areas of your ranch for others to use for recreation or even stay overnight. 2. Breathtaking Views and Natural Beauty Luxury real estate in Colorado guarantees views and enjoyment of open spaces, natural beauty, and changing landscapes throughout the year. You’re not just investing in the land but everything that surrounds it. Luxury and legacy ranches help preserve Colorado’s unique benefits and the lifestyle they afford. With a fruitful growing season, plenty of water, and varying climates, ranchers and farmers have leveraged Colorado’s beauty and agricultural opportunities for decades. We want to keep them alive for decades to come. 3. Stunning Luxury Homes and Architecture On a luxury ranch sits a luxury home. This home is your paradise, a place to sit back and soak in everything your luxury ranch offers.  Western luxury architecture strikes a delicate balance between opulence and nature, offering you the best of both worlds. You will usually find spacious interiors, high ceilings, and massive windows with picturesque views of the surrounding area. 4. Adventures Around Every Corner When you’re ready to leave the comfort of your luxury home for an adventure, you’re in luck because Colorado is the pinnacle of year-round recreation. In the summertime, you can enjoy hiking, horseback riding, fishing, and camping, to name a few. You can ski, snowshoe, ice-fish, and more in the wintertime. Fall and spring bring changing seasons and incredible views.  Are You Buying a Luxury Ranch in Colorado? A luxury ranch could be your calling if you’re craving a long-term escape from the city without sacrificing luxuries and amenities. As the broker/owner of Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, I’ve listed hundreds of Colorado properties for sale, including luxury ranches and recreational land. I know what sells luxury real estate, and I can help you find it too. You can browse my farm and ranch listings here. To set up a showing or learn more about buying or selling a luxury ranch in Colorado, contact me, Robert Gash, at 970-986-2955.

Read More

5 Things to Know About Hunting Properties For Sale

By in Colorado Lifestyle

When you’re in the market for Colorado hunting properties for sale, understanding the intricacies of landowner tags and hunting regulations on private land can significantly impact your decision-making process. These permits, also known as tags, are typically available to landowners and their designated individuals based on the acreage owned. Here, we’ll delve into five critical considerations when purchasing a Colorado hunting property. 1. Can You Hunt on Your Own Property in Colorado? You can hunt on your own Colorado property. However, it’s essential to clarify that you must still apply for hunting licenses like any other hunter in the state. The State of Colorado offers landowner tags to hunting property owners, granting them the opportunity to obtain tags in their Game Management Units (GMUs). These tags are distributed to landowners through an annual landowner lottery draw. It’s worth noting that landowners are not guaranteed a fixed number of tags each year; luck plays a role, just as it does for hunters in the general draw. Additionally, the qualifications are stringent: landowners must possess a minimum of 160 continuous deeded acres that are also used by wildlife or have agricultural cropland. 2. Can You Rent Your Colorado Hunting Property? Most land in Colorado is privately owned. You can freely hunt on privately owned lands, even if you are not the landowner, as long as you have obtained the landowner’s permission. However, it’s important to emphasize that privately owned lands are subject to Colorado’s hunting regulations, requirements, and laws. Hunters on private lands must also adhere to any landowner-specific regulations or requirements. Furthermore, hunters are expected to show utmost respect for all landowner property and rights. 3. Can You Transfer Landowner Tags? Landowner tags do not automatically transfer with the sale of hunting properties in Colorado. In fact, the sale of a Colorado hunting property voids any existing landowner tags for that private property.  Let’s say Seller Steve owns a 2000-acre hunting property. Earlier in the year, he acquired two landowner tags. In September, he lists his property for sale. In October, Buyer Bill makes an offer on the property. The closing date is set for November 31. Seller Steve can use his landowner tags until November 31. Alternatively, Seller Steve can transfer the tags to a third party who can also use the landowner tags until November 31. On November 31, the tags will become void. Buyer Bill will have the opportunity to apply for new tags the following hunting season. 4. Where Can You Hunt with a Landowner Tag? Colorado offers two primary types of landowner tags: unit-wide and private-land only. A unit-wide tag permits the hunter to access the private property for which the tag was issued. Additionally, it provides the privilege of hunting on all public land within that specific unit. 5. Understanding Landowner Preference Vouchers Colorado established the Landowner Preference Program (LPP) to offer landowners preference in obtaining hunting licenses. The program aims to encourage private landowners to maintain habitats that enhance wildlife populations, ultimately benefiting all hunters. It also discourages the hoarding of game animals on private lands during public hunting seasons and helps reduce hunting pressure on public lands by promoting hunting on private properties. Finding Colorado Hunting Properties For Sale Buying a Colorado hunting property involves navigating various complexities. For a smooth and informed purchase, you should collaborate with a local real estate broker with in-depth knowledge of the area’s GMUs, hunting restrictions, and nuances. Such a professional can guide you in acquiring a property that aligns with your recreational goals while ensuring compliance with Colorado’s hunting regulations. For expert guidance on finding and purchasing Colorado hunting properties for sale, contact me, Robert Gash, at Western Land & Lifestyle Properties. I can help you find or sell the perfect hunting property. Reach me at rob@wesellthewest.com or 970-986-2955 to embark on your hunting property journey.

Read More

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Agriculture in Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

When you think of Western Colorado, stunning landscapes and outdoor adventures may come to mind. However, beneath the picturesque scenes lies a thriving agricultural tapestry contributing significantly to the region’s unique character. Here are five intriguing insights that shed light on the lesser-known aspects of agriculture in Western Colorado. 1. Orchard and Vineyard Properties: A Fruitful Abundance Hidden among the rolling hills and verdant valleys of Western Colorado are sprawling orchard and vineyard properties that yield a bountiful harvest. These properties are not only a source of delectable fruits and premium wines but also a way of life. Orchards laden with apples, pears, cherries, and more, along with vineyards producing world-class wines, grace the landscape. The magic of owning an orchard or vineyard property extends beyond just land; it’s an opportunity to embrace a lifestyle that marries the richness of the land with the satisfaction of cultivation. 2. Water Rights: The Lifeline of Agriculture In arid Western Colorado, water is a precious commodity that plays an indispensable role in agriculture. The intricate system of water rights ensures equitable distribution and sustainable use of this valuable resource. For those exploring Colorado farm land for sale or Colorado acreage for sale, understanding water rights is essential. These rights, often tied to historical claims and agreements, determine the availability of water for irrigation, a factor critical to successful agricultural endeavors in this region. 3. The Varied Altitudes: A Palette of Possibilities The diverse altitudes in Western Colorado offer a unique canvas for agricultural ventures. From the high mesas to the fertile valleys, each elevation provides an array of possibilities for cultivation. This variability allows farmers to explore the cultivation of different crops at distinct altitudes, creating a symphony of flavors and colors across the region’s agricultural landscape. 4. Sustainable Practices: A Growing Trend Agriculture in Western Colorado isn’t just about producing exceptional crops; it’s also about practicing sustainable farming methods. The region has witnessed a surge in eco-friendly practices that prioritize soil health, water conservation, and biodiversity. These initiatives not only support the environment but also contribute to the superior quality of the agricultural products that emerge from this Colorado land. 5. The Community Connection: Farmers Markets and Beyond Agriculture in Western Colorado isn’t confined to fields and orchards; it thrives within the vibrant community. Farmers’ markets, local co-ops, and farm-to-table initiatives have gained immense popularity. The connection between farmers and consumers is strong, fostering a sense of shared responsibility and appreciation for the land’s bounty. Ready to Explore the Agricultural Landscape of Western Colorado? If these insights have piqued your interest and ignited your curiosity about the diverse world of agriculture in Western Colorado, don’t hesitate to dive deeper. Whether you’re in search of Colorado farm land for sale, Colorado acreage for sale, or want to uncover the allure of orchard and vineyard properties, I’m here to guide you. As an Accredited Land Consultant at Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, I can help you navigate the exciting opportunities that await. Contact me, Robert Gash, at rob@wesellthewest.com or 970-986-2955 to discover more about the land for sale options in Western Colorado. Let’s embark on a journey that celebrates the heart and soul of this remarkable region.

Read More

5 Things Denver Made Me Miss About Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Leaving Western Colorado after high school was an adventure I eagerly embraced. From Denver to Mannheim, Germany, to Laguna Niguel, California, and the winding paths in between, I experienced life outside small-town comfort. Returning to Denver, a city close to my heart, and eventually moving across different states, I’ve finally circled back to the embrace of Cedaredge.  Through this journey, I’ve realized that while the city sparkles with its allure, the everyday charms of small-town living hold unique magic. Here are five things my time in Denver made me miss about Western Colorado. 1. No Traffic and Easy Roads in Western Colorado I’ve often chuckled at my driving prowess, claiming I honed my skills navigating dirt roads and a lone stoplight in Cedaredge. I can navigate the Grand Mesa during a thunderstorm with the finesse of a local, but throw me into I-25’s rush hour madness, and my confidence wavers. The simplicity of Western Colorado’s roads and the absence of bumper-to-bumper traffic whisper a sigh of relief to my driving soul. 2. Free Events in Colorado’s Best Small Towns Denver’s vibrant scene comes at a cost – literally. Leaving my house often felt like shelling out a crisp Benjamin for entertainment. In contrast, Cedaredge and neighboring towns offer a bounty of nature’s wonders and community events that don’t dent the wallet. Whether hiking through pristine trails or partaking in local gatherings, Western Colorado infuses life with free-spirited joy. 3. Low Cost of Living on the Western Slope of Colorado On the Colorado real estate front, Western Colorado stretches my dollar further, giving me room to breathe and the means to invest in the future. Whether renting or owning, the Western Colorado real estate market is a testament to affordability without compromising space. The tug on my paycheck is gentler, leaving more room for dreams and adventures. 4. Small Towns in Colorado Make Friendly People? Calling strangers on the phone gives me mad anxiety. A few weeks ago, I finally reached the pinnacle of procrastination and needed to call the electric company to set up power in my new place. Luckily and unexpectedly, a forgiving voice on the other end of the line diffused my dread. No exasperation from 400 other calls that morning, just genuine help. Just my opinion, of course, but when everyone lives a slower-paced life in Western Colorado, they stress less and are warmer to strangers. 5. Western Colorado Has Nature Around Every Corner Surrounded by nature’s grandeur, Western Colorado embraces its residents in rugged beauty. The majesty of the Grand Mesa, the allure of the West Elk and San Juan Mountains, countless lakes, the Colorado National Monument, and the Ouray Hot Springs – the region is an adventurer’s haven. Weekends find solace in its arms, offering endless opportunities to unwind and rediscover peace of mind. Exploring Western Colorado Real Estate While Denver will always hold a piece of my heart, the tranquil embrace of Western Colorado tugs at my soul. As I return to the roots that nurtured me, I carry the lessons learned from cityscapes and the appreciation for the gems that shine brightly in my backyard. If you’re looking for small-town solace, I would love the opportunity to work as your Colorado real estate broker and help you find the perfect place to call home. With the help of my incredible real estate brokerage, Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, I have so many tools to make your real estate journey a breeze. Shoot me an email at kayla@wesellthewest.com or a text at 720-840-8717 to chat about your needs.

Read More

5 Benefits of Owning a Colorado Hunting Property

By in Colorado Lifestyle

When you’re pursuing the thrill of the hunt, few places rival Colorado’s rugged beauty and abundant wildlife. If you’re a passionate hunter looking to take your hunting experience to the next level, owning a hunting property in Colorado provides many benefits. In this blog post, we’ll explore five compelling reasons why owning a Colorado hunting property is a wise investment. 1. Hunting on Your Land One of the most significant advantages of owning a Colorado hunting property is the ability to hunt on your land. By having your hunting property, you gain priority to obtain a hunting permit for that Game Management Unit (GMU). This opportunity means enjoying exclusive access to prime hunting grounds while eliminating competition with other hunters. The freedom to hunt on your land allows for a more personalized and rewarding hunting experience. 2. Income Opportunities Owning a large hunting property in Colorado presents unique income opportunities. If you have more than 160 contiguous acres, you can apply for additional vouchers known as landowner tags. These vouchers can be sold to other hunters, providing you with a potential source of income. By leveraging the landowner voucher system, you can generate revenue while simultaneously enjoying the privileges of hunting on your property. 3. Building a Hunting Cabin or Vacation Home Imagine having your very own hunting cabin nestled in the heart of Colorado’s pristine wilderness. When it’s not hunting season, you can utilize your cabin as a cozy vacation home. Embrace the tranquility of the mountains, indulge in outdoor recreational activities, and create cherished memories with family and friends. Owning a hunting property allows you to escape the hustle and bustle of daily life and immerse yourself in nature’s beauty year-round. 4. Western Colorado’s Prime Game Management Units Western Colorado is renowned for its exceptional hunting opportunities, boasting some of the best Game Management Units (GMUs) in the state. In fact, of the top 48 GMUs for big game hunting, 43 are located in the western half of Colorado. For instance, GMU 421, spanning part of the Grand Mesa, ranked 21st for the number of bulls harvested between 2017 and 2019. By owning a hunting property in Western Colorado, you position yourself in the heart of prime hunting territory, increasing your chances of a successful and fulfilling hunting experience. 5. Land Appreciation Investing in a Colorado hunting property offers more than just recreational benefits; it’s also a smart financial move. Land is a limited resource, so its value appreciates over time, particularly in desirable areas. By purchasing a hunting property, you not only have the opportunity to enjoy the land while you own it, but you also have the potential to build equity and profit from its appreciation. It’s a win-win situation where you can relish your hunting adventures while making a sound long-term investment. Acquire Your Western Colorado Hunting Property If you’re ready to take the leap and invest in a Colorado hunting property, Western Land & Lifestyle Properties is here to assist you. As an accredited land consultant, I have extensive area knowledge. I can help you explore a range of hunting properties for sale in Western Colorado. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to create a hunting haven of your own. Contact me, Robert Gash, at 970-986-2955 or rob@wesellthewest.com to embark on an exciting journey toward owning your dream Colorado hunting property.

Read More

4 Types of Luxury Houses For Sale in Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

If you’re listing luxury houses for sale, you want to list them with a real estate broker who can effectively promote them to the right buyers. Especially in smaller towns, luxury real estate requires a specialized marketing skillset because you need to be able to reach out-of-state buyers and investors who might not even know about the region. In addition to marketing skills, your real estate broker must have a local reputation, just in case the perfect buyer lives in town. So, how do you balance national marketing and local reputation when you’re looking for a luxury real estate broker? Well, you can list with a company like Western Land & Lifestyle Properties – we pride ourselves on both. Let’s explore some different types of luxury houses for sale that we have unique, tailored marketing strategies to sell.  1. Luxury Mountain Homes and Cabins When it comes to selling your luxury mountain home or cabin, we understand the need to convey its unique allure. Our marketing strategy showcases not just the property but an aspirational mountain lifestyle. By emphasizing the breathtaking views, bespoke designs, and the tranquility these homes offer, we attract buyers seeking an escape into nature’s lap. 2. Luxury Ranch-Style Homes Selling your luxury ranch-style home demands a nuanced approach, and we excel in precisely that. We highlight the expansive landscapes, the privacy these ranches provide, and the seamless blend of elegance with the rugged charm of Western living. Our marketing ensures that potential buyers see not just a property but a lifestyle characterized by space, freedom, and sophistication. 3. Luxury Homes in Town Presenting your luxury house requires finesse, and our marketing strategy is tailored for just that. We focus on the convenience and vibrancy of in-town living, showcasing the architectural brilliance and contemporary elegance of these luxury houses for sale. Our approach targets buyers seeking a residence and a cosmopolitan lifestyle within the heart of thriving rural communities. 4. Luxury Historic Homes Selling a historic home is a distinctive process, but our expertise shines. Our real estate marketing strategy underlines the historical significance, architectural grandeur, and unique stories embedded in each historic home. By doing so, we attract buyers who appreciate the timeless elegance and character, turning your home into a living legacy. The Experts on Luxury Real Estate in Western Colorado No matter what kind of luxury houses for sale strike your fancy, at Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, we’ve dedicated our marketing efforts to reaching the widest pool of buyers for the most diverse property types. Our real estate marketing strategy has garnered local and national awards. Furthermore, our local community has recognized us as the Best Residential Real Estate Firm for two consecutive years, so we do a great job marketing properties locally. If you’re considering listing luxury real estate in Western Colorado, Western Land & Lifestyle Properties can help.

Read More

Guide to Buying Land For Sale To Build a Colorado Cabin

By in Colorado Lifestyle

The Colorado cabin lifestyle is highly coveted, and rightfully so. Imagine waking up in the cabin you built to suit your needs, looking out the window to a stunning mountain view, and building equity while pursuing the lifestyle of your dreams. The problem, however, with a lifestyle everyone wants to live is that the supply of mountain cabins for sale cannot satisfy the demand. As a result, many Colorado cabin dreamers are instead looking at vacant land for sale to buy and build. Here are some basic steps you can take to achieve the same. Investing in Land For Sale When you invest in land for sale, regardless of whether you build on it, you’re making a great financial decision. Land almost always appreciates because you can’t make more of it. Demand for land is especially high in the Colorado real estate market. Moreover, as the value of your land increases, you may be able to borrow against your equity in the property for money to build your cabin. Benefits of Building Your Colorado Cabin Buying land for sale to build your dream cabin allows you to craft your ideal experience that’s unique to you. Whether you want to fish, hunt, raise animals, garden, or recreate, Western Colorado has you can find land to accommodate. Furthermore, when you build a home or cabin, you can customize the layout to fit your needs for rooms, appliances, and energy efficiency.  Where to Find Vacant Land For Sale Your dream Colorado cabin craves the ideal location. Although I may be biased, I highly recommend Western Colorado. We have gorgeous mountain ranges, dynamic seasons, plenty of recreational activities, natural bodies of water, and other benefits for land owners. Even if you decide to look for land in another location, though, you should still pay attention to: Assembling Your Land For Sale Taskforce The final step in the land-buying, cabin-building process is assembling a team of professionals to bring your aspirations to fruition. If you plan to take a loan for the land or the construction, you’ll need a qualified mortgage officer to see what programs you qualify for. You may also want to find a land surveyor to determine the boundaries of the property lines and features. Finally, you’ll need a real estate broker familiar with land for sale in Western Colorado and the lifestyle you’re trying to achieve. As a Western Colorado broker and owner of Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, I can help. Get in touch with me for more information.

Read More

Exploring Pros and Cons of Living Off-Grid in Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

The Colorado real estate market appeals to diverse lifestyle seekers, including those looking for alternative and off-grid properties. After all, most people flock to Colorado for its natural beauty, so why not fully immerse yourself in it? If you’re wondering about living off-grid in Colorado, read on for a list of pros and cons and some vital information that will make your experience searching for property a lot more productive.  Pro: Sustainability and Freedom Off-grid living is popular among people who want to live more sustainably and autonomously. To live off-grid is to create more opportunities to be outside, enjoy nature, surround yourself with vast, open beauty, and teach yourself how to grow crops, raise livestock, and build complex systems that work for you. Living off-grid means you don’t have to succumb to HOA demands to change your house or keep your lights off when the electricity company raises its rates.  Pro: The Sunny Weather in Western Colorado With more than 300 sunny days per year and a healthy amount of precipitation, Colorado’s drastically changing seasons create a fantastic environment for alternative energy and growing crops. You can leverage the sun for solar power, water for hydropower, and the 157-day growing season to plant crops and stock up for the winter. Even though the winters may seem harsh, the snow runoff replenishes many water supplies throughout the rest of the year.  Con: Colorado Real Estate Rules and Regulations Colorado has several regulations that dictate your off-grid living experience, and your county, town, and even neighborhood may have more. Some rules and restrictions you should know about include: Con: Upkeep of the Property and Alternative Systems Most off-gridders choose the lifestyle because they crave the freedom and sustainability of living off your land. However, giving up modern conveniences is often inconvenient, expensive, and time-consuming. For example, if you live in a normal house on the grid and your main water line is clogged, you can usually solve it with a trip to your local hardware store. If you’re living off-grid and something happens to your well or another natural water source, it might not be as easy to solve.  Would You Live Off-Grid in Colorado? How did reading these pros and cons change your opinion about living off-grid in Colorado? If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the opportunities and challenges, the good news is that alternative properties are flexible. Maybe you want to live in an off-grid cabin miles from civilization, or perhaps you want to start with a backyard garden and solar power.  No matter what level of off-grid living appeals to you, you need a real estate broker knowledgeable about living off-grid in Western Colorado to help you get started. At Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, we specialize in Colorado real estate that empowers your dream lifestyle, so if living off-grid is that for you, we can help locate a property to support it. Contact me, Robert Gash, at 970-986-2955 to start your off-grid living property hunt today.

Read More

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Moving to Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Finding my home in Western Colorado wasn’t a linear journey. I grew up on a small ranch in Golden, Colorado before it became the populated suburbia you recognize today. My family raised goats and Arabian horses, and we had seemingly endless land when I was younger. For me, it represented freedom, tranquility, and opportunity. Then, I grew up, moved out, and started my career as a real estate developer and master electrician in Denver. I never forgot what it felt like to own land and have my personal slice of freedom in my backyard.  In 2007, I finally decided that I wanted it back. I relocated my family from the Denver area to my family’s land in Cedaredge, on the Western Slope of Colorado. I spent the following years refurbishing the property, digging ditches, building barns, corrals, and equipment sheds, and eventually getting my start in Western Colorado realty. Now, as a broker and the owner of Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, I have the privilege of helping people list Western Colorado properties for sale so other people can experience the joys of Western Colorado. If you’re considering moving to Western Colorado, here are five things I wish I had known when I was in your shoes. 1. You Get the Benefits of Colorado without the People Colorado is known for its mountains, nature, wildlife, rivers, and year-round recreational activities. Unfortunately, Colorado is also mostly known for these things near the Denver metro area.  Western Colorado has all of these advantages in excess, and the best benefit is that you can enjoy them without traffic, lines, crowds, and people. While Western Colorado accounts for 33% of the state’s land area, it only accounts for 10% of the population.  2. Western Colorado Winter Doesn’t Slow You Down The Grand Mesa, one of the world’s largest flattop mountains, is also one of the best spots in Western Colorado for winter recreational activities. With an average annual snowfall of 350 inches, the Grand Mesa is home to 30 miles of Nordic skiing trails, downhill skiing at Powderhorn Ski Resort, dozens of snowmobiling trails, the annual Summit Challenge Sled Dog Race, and more. Here, you never have to sit inside and mope about the weather! 3. Property Taxes are Low While real estate prices in Colorado are climbing, residents still enjoy low property taxes, and the same goes for Western Colorado. Property taxes in Delta County are roughly 0.35% compared to a state average of 0.49% 4. You Hate Driving in Denver More and More Each Time You Visit When you live in rural Colorado, you get used to traveling on nearly empty streets, commuting from city to recreation without traffic, and never driving for longer than 15 minutes to get to and from work. In the city, you could sit in an hour of highway traffic on your way to and from the office. Every time I’ve driven in Denver since I moved to Western Colorado, I’ve wondered more and more about how I used to do it every day. 5. You Get to Live Where You Play Perhaps my favorite thing about living on the Western Slope is that I never have to leave my house to experience its beauty. The mountains and open sky are in my backyard, the Grand Mesa is only a few minutes away, and the area is rife with other mountain ranges, open spaces, and things to do. Bonus – You Should Have Moved Sooner The final thing I wish I had known before moving to Western Colorado was how much I love it. It’s the best of everything Colorado offers at your fingertips – national forests, monuments, parks, opportunities, and a thriving Western Colorado realty landscape.  If you’re looking to capitalize on Western Colorado’s real estate industry while it’s still a bit of a hidden gem, let me know how I can help you buy and sell everything from luxury cabins to in-town homes to trophy ranches. At Western Land & Lifestyle Properties, we don’t just sell real estate; we sell lifestyle.

Read More

What is a Legacy Ranch and Why Are They Important?

By in Colorado Lifestyle

As a real estate broker in Western Colorado, I’m honored to have the unique privilege of visiting some of the area’s most pristine and prestigious ranches and farms. I’m not just talking about small, 15-acre ranches that were bought and sold throughout the decades – although those can be great too. I’m talking about the massive ranches and farms that have earned historical significance through years of blood, sweat, and tears from owners passionate about creating and sustaining agriculture, wildlife, and natural resources. What is the definition of a legacy ranch is just that – a ranch rooted in history and dedicated to preserving ranching tradition. Fellow ranchers and passionate Western Colorado inhabitants agree that this tradition of living sustainability off your land, providing for your community, and exploring the Western frontier is of the utmost importance.  Preserving a Sustainable Quality of Life In the modern world, where everything moves at the speed of light and most people flock to big cities for career opportunities, many of those same people overlook the foundation of the Western frontier. These lands were founded upon the desire for sustainability, freedom, heritage, and community.  Those of us who still honor those values look to legacy ranches to uphold them. We cannot find sustainability, freedom, heritage, and community in cities anymore, and many ranches have been subdivided and developed so much over the years that they’re virtually unrecognizable today. History of Legacy Ranches in Colorado Most legacy ranches in Colorado were founded in the 1800s and have remained in operation since. When miners began settling the West, they were allotted miner claims to 10.3 acres of land surrounding the areas we now know as Telluride, Durango, and Crested Butte, Colorado. Settlers formed townships and deeded agricultural grounds, allotting farmers 160-acre parcels to provide for the boom towns and miners. When the mining boom slowed, many ranchers who had claimed these parcels struggled to find demand for their livestock and crops. As people dispersed throughout the Western frontier, many ranchers traded their land to settle debts, resulting in fewer ranches with more acreage. Several of these ranches in Colorado have been passed down through generations and still exist today.  Due to increasing populations, rising career opportunities in industries other than agriculture, and tumultuous economic periods, many of the original ranches in Colorado cease to exist today. However, as owners subdivide, sell, and develop their ranches, we are losing a connection with the values that once made the West such an attractive place to settle and held sustainability in high regard.  Rarity and opportunity make legacy ranches in Colorado and throughout the Western United States very valuable, especially to those who want to maintain a connection between agriculture and their communities.  How To Purchase a Legacy Ranch in Colorado If you want to purchase a legacy ranch in Colorado and preserve Western tradition, there are two primary places to start. Western Land & Lifestyle Properties can help you with either.  First, you can purchase any land for sale in Colorado, with plans to expand as more surrounding land hits the market. There is nothing wrong with operating a hobby farm until you have more acreage. Alternatively, you can wait for a legacy ranch to hit the market. It may take longer, but, if you’re patient, it may be worth the wait. Either way, I would love to assist you in your legacy ranch-buying journey. Contact me, Robert Gash, to get started.

Read More

Why You Should Buy a Hunting Property in Western Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

What if you could hunt in your backyard? What if, next hunting season, you didn’t have to cram your buddies in the back of your pickup truck and drive two hours into the mountains? Instead, you can roll out of bed, get dressed, and walk out your door to your favorite activity. That’s why you should buy a hunting property in Western Colorado. Western Colorado is a hot spot for avid hunters and investors searching for hunting properties for sale, whether to hunt on their private land or sell hunting access to others. Of the top 48 GMUs for big game hunting based on the number of bulls or the success rate, 43 are located in the western half of Colorado. In fact, GMU 421, which spans part of the Grand Mesa, ranked 21st for the number of bulls in 2017-2019. Long story short, Western Colorado is a great place to hunt and a great place to start looking for hunting properties for sale. Here’s what you need to know. Can You Hunt on Your Own Property? Yes, you can hunt on your own property in Western Colorado. You need the appropriate license for hunting in whatever GMU your hunting property is located.  As a property owner, the state of Colorado will give you first priority in obtaining a hunting permit for your GMU. Since there are limited licenses available for certain GMUs during specified seasons and for different species, all other hunters must apply and are awarded hunting permits for a specified season through a drawing process.  Do Hunting Seasons Apply to Private Property? Hunting seasons apply to private property owners in Colorado, but there are still several perks associated with owning a hunting property. For example, I live on 60 acres in GMU 411. When rifle season rolls around, I have first priority to obtain a hunting permit for that GMU. Furthermore, I am the only one who can hunt on my property within GMU 411, so I don’t have to compete with other hunters for any game on my land. Even though other hunters can obtain a hunting permit for GMU 411, they cannot exercise that permit on my property without express permission. Furthermore, if you own more than 160 contiguous acres, you can apply for additional tags – called landowner tags – and sell them to other hunters. Landowner tags provide a great way to make money off your hunting land while enjoying all the benefits yourself! Finding Hunting Properties For Sale in Colorado If you’re wondering where to buy hunting land, wonder no longer. Western Colorado is here, and we have plenty of hunting properties for sale that fit your needs. Hunters and real estate investors can find quality recreational and hunting properties for sale with Western Land & Lifestyle Properties. If you’re buying or selling hunting property in Western Colorado, I would love to help. Call me at 970-986-2955 or email rob@wesellthewest.com to start your journey.

Read More

Essentials for Living Off-Grid in Colorado

By in Colorado Lifestyle

Rising prices and increasing access to information about sustainable living are driving more and more people to start researching off-grid properties for sale. Their desire to live off the grid makes sense, as reducing dependence on city systems is a fantastic way to save money on utility bills and live a more simple, sustainable life on your own land.   Where to Live Off-Grid in Colorado Location is one of the most critical considerations when looking at off-grid properties for sale. First, you need to find a county with zoning laws that allow living off-grid. More broadly, to live off your land, the climate must provide enough weather for alternative energy sources, water for drinking and irrigation, sunlight for growing crops, and comfortable temperatures for raising livestock.   When it comes to living off-grid in Colorado, Western Colorado is a prime location, offering abundant agricultural acres, an ideal climate for growing crops, dry air, abundant sunshine, and plenty of waterways. Many of the top-producing agricultural counties in Colorado are on the Western Slope. What You Want in Off-Grid Properties For Sale Before you retain a real estate broker to help you find off-grid properties for sale, you should check in with yourself about how off-grid you want to be. For example, some people just want to live a more sustainable, renewable lifestyle, so a house with solar electricity that’s otherwise still on the grid will suffice. Other people want to live fully off-grid, so they will need a property with alternative electricity and heating sources, spring-fed drinking water, an outhouse or composting toilet, and water rights for irrigating crops and sustaining animals. In Colorado, you must be cognizant of laws, covenants, and regulations that dictate what off-grid systems you can establish on your land. These include: If you plan to live on your off-grid property, you probably want to find alternative sources of electricity, water, and sewage. Luckily, natural resources are rife in Colorado with plenty of streams and 300 days of sunshine annually.  At the time of writing this blog post, we have several off-grid mountain lots for sale at the base of the Grand Mesa in the Oak Creek Reserve subdivision. Start Your Search for an Off-Grid Property in Colorado Today Nature, agriculture, and a zest for sustainability run deep through Western Colorado, so you’ve chosen the perfect place to settle. Consider how off-grid you want to live, what restrictions may stand in your way, and what alternative energy sources you plan to use. Then, you’re ready to meet with a real estate broker to start hunting. If you want to explore living off-grid in Colorado, Western Land & Lifestyle Properties can help you identify the perfect property. Call me, Robert Gash, at 970-986-2955 to start searching today.

Read More